Should college athletes get paid to play essay

Famous sportsmen and sportswomen have statuses similar to Hollywood celebrities, and their wages are high. However, no matter how well they play, all of them have once been amateurs; in this perspective, high school or college athletes are not much different from professionals. At the same time, the NCAA National Collegiate Athletic Association prohibits college athletes to be monetarily compensated for their efforts, which is definitely unfair. College athletes should be paid their due for a number of reasons.

Should college athletes get paid to play essay

In his article about collegiate sports programs, Thomas Rosandich refers to a "performance pyramid", which shows the general progression of athletic organizations in the United States. As the pyramid progresses, the level of competition increases, while the number of competitors decreases until the highest level of organized sport, professional sportsis reached.

In many respects, the intercollegiate sports level serves as a feeder system to the professional level, as the elite college athletes are chosen to compete at the next level.

This system differs greatly from nearly all other countries in the world, which generally have government-funded sports organizations that serve as a feeder system for professional competition. As well, in many countries professional clubs recruit athletes as children and develop them in their own academies, rather than through high school sports, signing them to professional contracts before they are done secondary school.

Viewed retrospectively over the past plus years of its history, intercollegiate athletics has moved from mainly providing an avenue for student athletes and fans to enjoy sports participation to predominantly focusing on increases in revenue and institutional prestige that can Revenues and expenses[ edit ] College athletics have a significant economic impact on their schools and local communities.

Universities produce substantial revenue from their intercollegiate athletic programs in ticket and merchandise sales. Only one in eight of the Division I colleges actually netted more money than they spent on athletics between the years and At the few money making schools, football and sometimes basketball sales support the school's other athletic programs.

The amount spent on an athlete in one of the six highest-profile football conferences, on average, is six times more than the amount spent to educate the non-athlete.

The law states that: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance The regulations pertaining to athletics require that an institution which sponsors interscholastic, intercollegiate, club or intramural athletics shall provide "equal athletic opportunity" for members of both sexes.

In order to successfully comply with Title IX requirements, NCAA institutions must meet one of the requirements in the "three prong test" as follows: Prong one - Provide athletic participation opportunities that are substantially proportionate to student enrollment.

This part of the test is satisfied when participation opportunities for men and women are "substantially proportionate" to their respective undergraduate enrollment. This part of the test is satisfied when an institution has a history and continuing practice of program expansion that is responsive to the developing interests and abilities of the underrepresented sex typically female.

This part of the test is satisfied when an institution is meeting the interests and abilities of its female students even where there are disproportionately fewer females than males participating in sports.

They have the power to pull federal funding from schools or organizations that are found to be non-compliant with title IX, although this power has never been exercised.

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The OCR will usually work with the school or organization that is non-compliant to set up a schedule or plan to follow to become compliant. In its peak, the AIAW had almost 1, member schools. In the early s, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and the National Collegiate Athletic Association began sponsoring intercollegiate championships for women, and the AIAW discontinued operation after the season.

Since its passing, Title IX has allowed for female participation to almost double in college sports. Before the law was passed in fewer than 30, girls participated in college sports; as of more thangirls participated in college sports. Questions have been raised over the equity between male and female student athletes.

Females, regardless of whether an administrator, coach, or athlete, thought there to be less equity than males when it comes to these five factors: In addition, Title IX legislation has affected male athletes as well as male coaches.

Title IX has been associated with the cutting of opportunities available for men and boys. As budgets are stretched to accommodate additional programming requirements for women and girls. More than 2, men's athletic teams have been eliminated since to comply with the proportionality prong of Title IX requirements.

Before Title IX, 90 percent of women's intercollegiate teams were coached by women. Although the actual number of female coaches increased between andthe percentage of female coaches continued to decline over that same period. In addition, although men have broken into coaching female athletes, female coaches have not experienced the same opportunities to coach male athletes.

In99 percent of collegiate men's teams were coached by men, and the same is true today. Increasing female participation in sports has had a direct effect on women's education and employment. Please help improve it by rewriting it in an encyclopedic style.

May This section contains close paraphrasing of one or more non-free copyrighted sources. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Ideas in this article should be expressed in an original manner.

May Professional pay[ edit ] Recently,[ when? In the 21st century, the high, rising income paid to some colleges by the media for transmitting games to their television audiences, has led some people to complain that the athletes should share in the colleges income.

A few schools benefit from owning their own networks. This money is spread through administrators, athletic directors, coaches, media outlets, and other parties.

None is given directly to the players.I'm not saying we should be paying athletes $5, or even $10, per semester. If each athlete got $2, paid over the course of the semester, this would give them some spending cash and an opportunity to start managing their money.

Yahoo Lifestyle is your source for style, beauty, and wellness, including health, inspiring stories, and the latest fashion trends. Should College Athletes Be Paid Essay. College Athletes Shouldn’t Be Paid While catching up on some game day scores for college football, an article popped up on the side with a title reading, College Athletes Deserve To Be Paid.

May When people care enough about something to do it well, those who do it best tend to be far better than everyone else.

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There's a huge gap between . Should college athletes be paid to play their sport? This has been a hot topic discussed by many people over the past several years. Through my research, I have .

Should college athletes get paid to play essay

At some colleges, college athletics are a key source of income, and they attract students to their institutions. Universities depend on their athletes to produce and maintain the popularity of .

College athletics in the United States - Wikipedia